Norepi

howtocatchamonster:

Funny Games is a cinematic version of the philosophical riddle of a tree falling in a forest, leading not only to a heightened sense of being an accomplice on the part of the audience but also to asking questions regarding the audience’s responsibility, the obligation to think about what it means to look at violent imagery and the pain of others and the capacity to understand the absurdity, randomness, and brutality that the violent images actually show. Funny Games is meant to lead to reflection, to catch the audience looking in order to make them conscious of their own look. By establishing an interconnection between the diegesis and the non-diegesis, the film creates an “ethical space” where the audience is held as an accomplice to a representation of violence that they do not even want to see. The audience position in Funny Games, then, is of necessity ethically charged, since this consciousness cannot arise without simultaneously revealing moral values with regard to (media) violence.

Tarja Laine, “Haneke’s ‘Funny Games’ with the Audience.”

asfailedontv:

She should have known better than to eat Taco Bell right before the evening gown competition… http://ift.tt/1wycOj3

asfailedontv:

She should have known better than to eat Taco Bell right before the evening gown competition… http://ift.tt/1wycOj3

Sometimes you meet someone and even though you
never liked brown eyes before, their eyes are your now favourite colour.
Anonymous  (via seulray)
So if we wanted to watch some French animation, what films would you suggest?
Anonymous

somewovendissonance:

disneyforprincesses:

ursulatheseabitchh:

the Triplets of Belleville is about an elderly woman searching for her son who was kidnapped in the middle of a Tour de France race. It’s largely free of dialogue, but the sound effects and such are wonderful. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature—it lost to Finding Nemo.

A Cat in Paris is about a young girl and her cat who discover mysteries in the course of one night. It was also nominated for an Oscar for Best Animated Feature, but it lost to Rango.

Persepolis is based on an autobiographical graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi about her early life in Iran. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, but it lost to Ratatouille.

the Illusionist is about an aging magician and an imaginative young girl who form a father/daughter relationship. It was also nominated for a Best Animation Oscar, but lost to Toy Story 3.

The Rabbi’s Cat is a story about a cat who swallows a parrot and gains the ability to speak like a human. It is set in 1920’s Algeria.

Ernest & Celestine is the adorable story about a big bear and a little mouse who forge an unlikely friendship. It was also nominated for an Oscar in Best Animated Picture, but lost to Frozen.

Kirikou and the Sorceress is a story inspired by West African folklore that tells the story of Kirikou, a boy who was born with the ability to walk and talk, who saves his people from an evil witch. The film was popular enough to spawn sequels and a stage adaptation.

A Monster in Paris is a 3D animated musical film that is reaaaaalllly loosely based on the Phantom of the Opera. It’s set in 1910 and is about, surprisingly, a monster that lives in Paris, and his love for a young singer.

The King and the Mockingbird is an 80’s film about a cruel king titled Charles V + III = VIII + VIII = XVI, who is obsessed with a young shepherdess, and whose attempts to capture the young girl are thwarted by a mockingbird whose wife the King had previously killed.  

Those are probably the most famous of the feature length animated films.

But the animated short films are just as glorious. Here’s a compilation of a bunch of short films and I can link you to others as well. 

Sorry for the long answer but I just really love French animation.

Reblogging over here. French animation tends to do better with diversity than Disney does, hahaha.

who’s gonna watch these with me?

everydaycomics:

Graveyard Shift (C) Daryl Toh Liem Zhan 2013. 

everydaycomics:

Graveyard Shift (C) Daryl Toh Liem Zhan 2013. 

wolves-among-creeps:

foxhaven:

moarrrmagazine:

What’s in store for me in the direction I don’t take? 
- Adam Lupton

Holy mother fuck

Consider me deeply impacted

memewhore:

NOW he has crossed the line!


The fucked up thing is that this would seriously happen to me

memewhore:

NOW he has crossed the line!

The fucked up thing is that this would seriously happen to me
My finger slipped on my ipad and I accidentally unfollowed someone

I didn’t catch who it was, but now I’m going to be worried about it T_T

intersouls:

This exact moment in Charlie’s angels is so iconic in my life

intersouls:

This exact moment in Charlie’s angels is so iconic in my life

intersouls:

This exact moment in Charlie’s angels is so iconic in my life

intersouls:

This exact moment in Charlie’s angels is so iconic in my life

unexplained-events:

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark: Gammell vs Helquist

A few examples (since i can only fit 10) comparing the illustrations of Gammell and Helquist in the 30th Anniversary edition of “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark”

1) Title Page

2) The Walk

3) The Haunted House

4) The Red Spot

5) Harold

I feel like the older illustrations were what made the stories even scarier.

I cannot even begin to describe how upsetting I find the new illustrations, I highly recommend reading this article because it gives a great analysis and critique of the old vs. new pictures.

shellcrazy:

peruvian—goddess:

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHA

goddess-of-moss:

promiscuous-petal:

enough about sex positions has anyone discovered a reading position which doesn’t get uncomfortable after 5 minutes

omg yes.